A place for my geography-geek side to let loose.

My regular page is: solipsismnow.tumblr.com

 

cartoonpolitics:

"This is a government of the people, by the people, and for the people no longer. It is a government of corporations, by corporations, and for corporations.” ~ (Rutherford B. Hayes)

cartoonpolitics:

"This is a government of the people, by the people, and for the people no longer. It is a government of corporations, by corporations, and for corporations.” ~ (Rutherford B. Hayes)

(Source: editorialcartoonists.com)

earthstory:

Castle Mountain
This photo is of Castle Mountain, one of the remarkable peaks that define the skyline of Banff National Park in Canada.
The type of mountain you see here is actually called a “castellate” structure due to its shape. The layers are beds of sedimentary rocks which sit almost horizontal; as they erode, the layers give rise to horizontal towers and step-like features, reminiscent of castle construction techniques.
The rocks you’re look at are Precambrian to Cambrian in age, over 500 million years old. They were deposited off the western coast of Laurentia, the continent that today is called North America. The setting was a passive margin – quiet waters off of the coastline of an ocean, where sediments from the continent could be deposited creating shales and organisms began growing shells of carbonate, forming limestones.
Low in this sequence, at about the tree line, sits the Castle Mountain thrust fault, a key feature in creating the entire park. The ancient sediments at the top have been pushed up on top of much younger rocks by a sequence of thrust faults, formed as the Rocky Mountains were growing about 100 million years ago. As the Farallon Plate subducted beneath North America, it squeezed the rocks, folding some, faulting others, and pushing them up towards the sky.
Many of the gorgeous parks of the North American West owe their existence to the history of subduction of the Farallon Plate beneath that continent.
-JBB
Image credit: Mirari Erdoizahttp://www.fotopedia.com/items/anboto-GktAyNvqSLE
Read more:http://www.mountainnature.com/geology/platetectonics.htmhttp://books.google.com/books?id=X4mnaRet4uYC&pg=PA5http://www.cspg.org/documents/Conventions/Archives/Annual/2003/517S0420.pdfhttp://www.peakfinder.com/peakfinder.ASP?PeakName=castle+mountain+%28alberta%29

earthstory:

Castle Mountain

This photo is of Castle Mountain, one of the remarkable peaks that define the skyline of Banff National Park in Canada.

The type of mountain you see here is actually called a “castellate” structure due to its shape. The layers are beds of sedimentary rocks which sit almost horizontal; as they erode, the layers give rise to horizontal towers and step-like features, reminiscent of castle construction techniques.

The rocks you’re look at are Precambrian to Cambrian in age, over 500 million years old. They were deposited off the western coast of Laurentia, the continent that today is called North America. The setting was a passive margin – quiet waters off of the coastline of an ocean, where sediments from the continent could be deposited creating shales and organisms began growing shells of carbonate, forming limestones.

Low in this sequence, at about the tree line, sits the Castle Mountain thrust fault, a key feature in creating the entire park. The ancient sediments at the top have been pushed up on top of much younger rocks by a sequence of thrust faults, formed as the Rocky Mountains were growing about 100 million years ago. As the Farallon Plate subducted beneath North America, it squeezed the rocks, folding some, faulting others, and pushing them up towards the sky.

Many of the gorgeous parks of the North American West owe their existence to the history of subduction of the Farallon Plate beneath that continent.

-JBB

Image credit: Mirari Erdoiza
http://www.fotopedia.com/items/anboto-GktAyNvqSLE

Read more:
http://www.mountainnature.com/geology/platetectonics.htm
http://books.google.com/books?id=X4mnaRet4uYC&pg=PA5
http://www.cspg.org/documents/Conventions/Archives/Annual/2003/517S0420.pdf
http://www.peakfinder.com/peakfinder.ASP?PeakName=castle+mountain+%28alberta%29

earthstory:

TORNADO!This tornado was captured on camera by Lorraine M. Photography at Rozel, Kansas, USA on 18 May 2013, using a Canon 7D. The tornado was rated a 4 on the Enhanced Fujita Scale (EF Scale). This scale rates the strength of tornadoes based on the damage they cause.The EF Scale goes from EF-0 (wind speeds of 104–137km/h) to EF-5 (wind speeds greater than 322km/h). An EF-4 tornado has wind speeds between 267 and 322km/h. The EF scale contains 28 damage indicators (DI), each of which has differing numbers of degrees of damage (DoD). Larger DoD correspond to higher wind speeds.-TELhttps://www.facebook.com/CapturedbyLorrainewww.capturedbylorraine.comMore information on the tornado scale:http://www.spc.noaa.gov/efscale/; http://past.theweathernetwork.com/news/storm_watch_stories3&stormfile=Assessing_tornado_damage__EF-scale_vs._F-scale_19_04_2013; http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/satellite/satelliteseye/educational/fujita.html

earthstory:

TORNADO!

This tornado was captured on camera by Lorraine M. Photography at Rozel, Kansas, USA on 18 May 2013, using a Canon 7D. The tornado was rated a 4 on the Enhanced Fujita Scale (EF Scale). This scale rates the strength of tornadoes based on the damage they cause.

The EF Scale goes from EF-0 (wind speeds of 104–137km/h) to EF-5 (wind speeds greater than 322km/h). An EF-4 tornado has wind speeds between 267 and 322km/h. The EF scale contains 28 damage indicators (DI), each of which has differing numbers of degrees of damage (DoD). Larger DoD correspond to higher wind speeds.

-TEL


https://www.facebook.com/CapturedbyLorraine
www.capturedbylorraine.com

More information on the tornado scale:http://www.spc.noaa.gov/efscale/http://past.theweathernetwork.com/news/storm_watch_stories3&stormfile=Assessing_tornado_damage__EF-scale_vs._F-scale_19_04_2013http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/satellite/satelliteseye/educational/fujita.html

earthstory:

YOSEMITE… sigh…
This time with a rainbow. I swear, every time you think it can’t possibly look more lovely than the last photo of Yosemite we posted, here comes another shot that makes the heart and spirit soar.
Annie R
Photo by Mike Reeves, who gets to take photos of Yosemite for a living. Jealous, or what?https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-Reeves-Photography/354497123758
Favorite Yosmite sites:https://www.facebook.com/yosemiteconservancy?fref=photohttps://www.facebook.com/projectyosehttp://www.nps.gov/yose/index.htm

earthstory:

YOSEMITE… sigh…

This time with a rainbow. I swear, every time you think it can’t possibly look more lovely than the last photo of Yosemite we posted, here comes another shot that makes the heart and spirit soar.

Annie R

Photo by Mike Reeves, who gets to take photos of Yosemite for a living. Jealous, or what?
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Mike-Reeves-Photography/354497123758

Favorite Yosmite sites:
https://www.facebook.com/yosemiteconservancy?fref=photo
https://www.facebook.com/projectyose
http://www.nps.gov/yose/index.htm

ecowatchorg:

Climate Change Causes Chain Reaction in Ecosystems
An ecosystem is made up of a multitude of species interacting with each other and this study has shown that many of the climate-related impacts on a given species occur as a result of changes in other species within the ecosystem, which then cascade through …
SEE MORE:
http://ecowatch.com/2014/04/15/climate-change-chain-reaction-ecosystems/

ecowatchorg:

Climate Change Causes Chain Reaction in Ecosystems

An ecosystem is made up of a multitude of species interacting with each other and this study has shown that many of the climate-related impacts on a given species occur as a result of changes in other species within the ecosystem, which then cascade through …

SEE MORE:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/04/15/climate-change-chain-reaction-ecosystems/

The Laws Of Physics Are Not Negotiable : Global Warming Has Not Stopped And It Will Go On For Centuries.

wotfigo:

image

"There is no standstill in global warming," Jarraud said as he presented the WMO’s annual review of the world’s climate which concluded that 2013 tied with 2007 as the sixth hottest year since 1850 when recording of annual figures began.

"The warming of our oceans has accelerated, and at…

earthstory:

THE MANPUPUNER FORMATIONSIn Mansi their name means “little mountain of the gods”, but they are also known as the Seven Strong Men. They are found in the Komi Republic in the Northern Ural Mountains of Russia, which are among the world’s oldest extant mountain ranges. These mountain ranges extend 2,498 km from the Kazakh steppes along the northern border of Kazakhstan to the coast of the Arctic Ocean.The Manpupuner Formations are 30 to 42 metres high and visitors are advised not to attempt to climb the Strong Men, though there are unsubstantiated claims that climbers have fallen. These beautiful structures have been little studied and are relatively unknown to tourists outside of Russia; within Russia they are known as one of the country’s Seven Wonders.The geology of these columns dates back at least 200-300 million years; they are composed of crystalline schists originating from a mountain. Over the course of time the area was eroded by rain, wind and frost. Several of the columns are narrower at the base, and six of the ‘Men’ are huddled together, leaving the 7th looking as though it is standing apart.According to a local legend, the stone pillars were once seven giants: the Samoyeds, who walked through the mountains to Siberia, to destroy the Vogulsky (Mansi) people. Upon seeing the holy Vogulsky Mountains, the shaman of the giants dropped his drum and the entire group froze into the stone pillars.-TELMore info (in Russian but you can translate it badly into English using the site’s ‘translate’ function):http://www.utro-russia.ru/news.html?id=35043More photos here: http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/featured/seven-gigantic-rock-figures-rising-beneath-urals/17781Image: Komi Republic http://rkomi.ru/en/

earthstory:

THE MANPUPUNER FORMATIONS

In Mansi their name means “little mountain of the gods”, but they are also known as the Seven Strong Men. They are found in the Komi Republic in the Northern Ural Mountains of Russia, which are among the world’s oldest extant mountain ranges. These mountain ranges extend 2,498 km from the Kazakh steppes along the northern border of Kazakhstan to the coast of the Arctic Ocean.

The Manpupuner Formations are 30 to 42 metres high and visitors are advised not to attempt to climb the Strong Men, though there are unsubstantiated claims that climbers have fallen. These beautiful structures have been little studied and are relatively unknown to tourists outside of Russia; within Russia they are known as one of the country’s Seven Wonders.

The geology of these columns dates back at least 200-300 million years; they are composed of crystalline schists originating from a mountain. Over the course of time the area was eroded by rain, wind and frost. Several of the columns are narrower at the base, and six of the ‘Men’ are huddled together, leaving the 7th looking as though it is standing apart.

According to a local legend, the stone pillars were once seven giants: the Samoyeds, who walked through the mountains to Siberia, to destroy the Vogulsky (Mansi) people. Upon seeing the holy Vogulsky Mountains, the shaman of the giants dropped his drum and the entire group froze into the stone pillars.

-TEL

More info (in Russian but you can translate it badly into English using the site’s ‘translate’ function):http://www.utro-russia.ru/news.html?id=35043
More photos here: http://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/featured/seven-gigantic-rock-figures-rising-beneath-urals/17781

Image: Komi Republic http://rkomi.ru/en/

esri:

How Do States Tax Their Citizens?
This story map allows you to view tax rates across the US. See how your state compares to others.

esri:

How Do States Tax Their Citizens?

This story map allows you to view tax rates across the US. See how your state compares to others.

earthstory:

EXAMINING A FAULT SCARP
These goats appear to be geologic enthusiasts. They seem to be examining, at eyeball distance, the details of a fault scarp.
Now – anytime a geologist observes a slope in nature that is in excess of about 33 degrees, he/she really has to pay attention to it. This angle is, for geological material, what is called the angle of repose: the angle of repose is the maximum slope along which loose material will remain in place without sliding down. While the angle of repose varies with the material, its degree of solidification, and how wet it might be, a geologist should become tectonically wary of any slope steeper than 30 degrees. In short, how did it become so steep as to be unstable?
Fault scarps, particularly active fault scarps, are prime suspects for being the cause of really steep surfaces. However, steep surfaces could also be caused by the failure of a mass by cracking off along a joint surface, or an immense flood, or some non-natural cause (like a bulldozer or dynamite). Come to think of it, you’d really need to examine the rock surface, like these goats are doing, to figure it out.
Gee. Note also that the angle of repose for a geologist, rather than for a rock climber, is a lot less than 33 degrees. Otherwise any old goat could do it.
Annie R
This photo is floating all over the net, and I’ve not been able to locate its source. So, thank you to the unknown photographer: if anyone knows who took this photo, please let us know! We’d love to credit them!

earthstory:

EXAMINING A FAULT SCARP

These goats appear to be geologic enthusiasts. They seem to be examining, at eyeball distance, the details of a fault scarp.

Now – anytime a geologist observes a slope in nature that is in excess of about 33 degrees, he/she really has to pay attention to it. This angle is, for geological material, what is called the angle of repose: the angle of repose is the maximum slope along which loose material will remain in place without sliding down. While the angle of repose varies with the material, its degree of solidification, and how wet it might be, a geologist should become tectonically wary of any slope steeper than 30 degrees. In short, how did it become so steep as to be unstable?

Fault scarps, particularly active fault scarps, are prime suspects for being the cause of really steep surfaces. However, steep surfaces could also be caused by the failure of a mass by cracking off along a joint surface, or an immense flood, or some non-natural cause (like a bulldozer or dynamite). Come to think of it, you’d really need to examine the rock surface, like these goats are doing, to figure it out.

Gee. Note also that the angle of repose for a geologist, rather than for a rock climber, is a lot less than 33 degrees. Otherwise any old goat could do it.

Annie R

This photo is floating all over the net, and I’ve not been able to locate its source. So, thank you to the unknown photographer: if anyone knows who took this photo, please let us know! We’d love to credit them!